Dealing with Case Study Rejects

In my last post, I talked about the three questions you should ask potential case study customers. If a customer ends up being a bad fit for a case study, don’t tell him or her. In these cases, honesty is never the best policy. Continue reading

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Case Study Interviewing 101

After you’ve found and vetted a customer, you can’t just ring him or her up and ask a few random questions. Well, you can, but that wouldn’t produce a good case study. Like a good scout, you always need to be prepared. Here’s what you need to do. Continue reading

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Interviewing 101: Talk to a Real, Live Person

I’m not trying to insult anyone’s intelligence here, but a successful case study interview requires actually interviewing someone. I mention this because I’ve been asked to write case studies based on quotes taken from testimonial videos and anecdotal background details provided by the sales team. I’ve also heard people suggest assigning a sales team member to write a case study based on overall knowledge of a deal. Again, no, no, no, no, and no. Continue reading

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Oh !@#$: The Recording Didn’t Record

I forgot to mention this earlier, but technology fails happen. You can’t avoid them, but you do need to prepare for them. Continue reading

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Interviewing 101: Conducting the Interview

Next up comes the moment of truth: the actual case study interview. If you’ve taken the time to prepare, it should go off more or less without a hitch. Continue reading

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Writing: How to Make It Quick and (Relatively) Painless

Your interview went well, your technology came through, and you have an audio recording of the interview, most likely someplace on your computer. Now you have the fun job of sifting through all of that information and starting to put it into some sort of coherent shape. So where do you start? Continue reading

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Forget Writing; Frame and Embellish Instead

You now have a bunch of raw customer quotes arranged in basic case study order. These quotes are the most important parts of your story, and your job is to simply connect and frame them in a way that maximizes their impact and gets your point across. It’s more like interior design than writing; the “furniture” is already there, you just need to move it around and add some pieces until it “looks” (and, in this case, sounds) fabulous. But how? Continue reading

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